Spring Housing Season Kicks Off With Short Supply

Dated: 03/22/2016

Views: 686

On a snowy Tuesday in early February, Jessie and Mark Sciulli toured a home in the northern suburbs of Washington, D.C., that wasn't listed for sale yet. Relocating their family back home from overseas, the couple was in town for just two days and had to see as much as possible. Their agent didn't have enough active listings to show, so she went after homes she knew were coming soon.

It is the same story for home buyers nationwide: There is precious, record little for sale.

"I feel like there is not a lot of inventory right now, so that does make us a little bit nervous, because we think there is going to be a lot more offered in two or three weeks, so I'd say for sure we feel that stress," said Jessie.

Open House signage is displayed outside of a home for sale in Redondo Beach, California. Getty Images Open House signage is displayed outside of a home for sale in Redondo Beach, California.

Presidents Day weekend is traditionally seen by real estate agents and homebuilders as the start of the spring housing market — the busiest time of year for home sales. The number of listings always rises, and it will this year as well, but inventory is already so low to begin with that even the new listings will not be nearly enough.

"I think inventory is going to remain tight. The closer you are to urban centers, the tighter the inventory, because the demand is strong, and a lot of that stuff gets scooped up before it hits the market," said Jane Fairweather, a real estate agent in Bethesda, Maryland.

The latest numbers paint an empty picture. Inventory at the end of December nationally was down nearly 4 percent from the previous December, but sales were up nearly 8 percent, according to the National Association of Realtors. The supply of homes for sale was the lowest since the start of 2005, and back then there were far more homes being built to add to overall supply. As for January, the NAR's listing site, Realtor.com, reported that listings were down a sharper 4.4 percent from a year ago.

In local markets, the January readings are coming in even tighter. Total listings in Charlotte, North Carolina, dropped nearly 24 percent in January from a year ago, with the number of new listings down 6 percent. In Denver, more than 4,000 homes came onto the market in January, but total inventory remained at historically low levels. Buyers scooped up more than came on.

January inventory was down nearly 17 percent in Philadelphia from a year ago, and Washington, D.C., had so few listings it would take less than two months at the current sales pace to exhaust supply. A healthy housing market traditionally has four to six months' worth of inventory for sale.

America's emptiest and fullest cities


"Half the [D.C.] homes sold in January were on the market for 26 days, and the competition among buyers pushed the average percent of asking price received at sale up to 98.6 percent," according to the Greater Capital Area Association of Realtors. "The $504,250 median price for the month was slightly higher than last year (1.9 percent) and marked the highest January level on record for the District."

"The inventory question is a puzzle," said Chris Herbert, managing director of Harvard's Joint Center for Housing Studies. "If you drill down and say, what's happening at the lower end of the market, what's happening in more affordable neighborhoods, those places had a much more dramatic boom-bust in house prices. Even though prices have come back there pretty strongly, they are much more likely to be underwater or low equity, so I think part of it is even though we think we have seen the market heal, there's still a lot of healing left to do." 

Herbert also points to younger baby boomers, who lost home equity and more in the recession, and who are not trading up as much as their age group historically does. They are staying put in their homes, not adding to much-needed inventory. Add it up and it comes out to less — less inventory, which in turn puts upward pressure on prices. 

Sellers, however, appear to be seeing a limit. They are not pricing their homes as aggressively as they did last fall, according to real estate brokerage Redfin. While homes are selling fast, not everything sells, especially if it's overpriced. Sellers know the only thing worse than not getting top dollar is sitting on the market and becoming a "stale" listing.

"Even with surging home prices, listings were still down in January from a year ago," said Redfin chief economist Nela Richardson. "Sellers are worried that today's buyers won't pay enough for their current home to finance their next-level house."

Back in suburban D.C., after an exhausting two days and 19 home tours, the Sciullis left without a home.

Price reduced home for saleGolden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, CaliforniaCooling ahead for high-end San Fran realestate

Blog author image

Shirley Henderson

Being transplanted into the little town of Easley in 1969,from Ohio was a great shocker. So,I guess you could say I'm a Half Breed Southern. I’ve really enjoyed the people and the quietness of the a....

Latest Blog Posts

Fall For Greenville Music Line Up

Are you headed to Fall for Greenville this weekend? The link below will provide you the musical line up! So thankful the bad weather is behind us and everyone can enjoy this amazing event! :

Read More

12300 Indian Mound Road Ware Shoals SC

29692 - Updated Sept 2018!! - New kitchen counters and appliances! Original wood flooring reconditioned throughout the house. All rooms freshly painted! Wrap around porch with new floors and new

Read More

Oct 11 2018 3564 2

222 Ne Edney Road$178,500 Single Family 2 Beds, 2 Baths, 1,353 Sqr Ft, Belton29627 - Very nice 2 bedroom 2 bath home, move in ready with 8 acres, with barn and storage shed, fenced in

Read More

Oct 11 2018 3564 1

1011 Port Anne Cove$165,000 Lot-Land 0 Beds, 0 Baths, Anderson Price Reduction29625 - Waterfront lot in exclusive topsail bay community. Lot 46 green zone has over 111 feet of water

Read More